Beethoven: Violin Sonata, Op. 96 - Enescu: Violin Sonata, Op. 25 (1983)

Beethoven, Enescu

David Abel, Julie Steinberg

This composition occupies a special place among Beethoven’s creations because it shows aunique quality: there is an olympian elegance, a profound gentleness that pervades the entire work. Nowhere does Beethoven the earth shaker appear. Even the scherzo movement does not disturb this sustained thoughtfulness. 
Violin and piano begin trading short thematic statements in quick exchange from the first notes of the first movement. Parallel arpeggios create a growing intensity. The middle section of the movement is characterized by abrupt modulations and an increased pace of exchanges. A striking procedure is the use of a seemingly interminable trill, nearly heart-stopping in its intensity. 
The second movement, Adagio expressivo, one of Beethoven’s floating Adagios, is based on the compulsion of a slow intense bass movement. The serenity of this movement is not disturbed by elaborate decoration from both instruments. And this stillness is further emphasized by a fourteen measure repeating pedal point (nearly one-fifth of the movement) which closes it.

Enescu absorbed the folk styles of his country in all of their complexity. He found slides, microtones, augmented seconds, insistent repeated notes played on the cimbalom, drone effects, free rhythms, four and five note gapped scales, tone patterns that repeat over and over (ostinatos). Important notes in melodies were approached by a fast swarming over neighboring notes.
All of these devices Enescu appropriated along with the very special folk harmonies based on chords built of as many as five consecutive thirds and of rhythms derived partly from the complexities of spoken Rumanian (termed parlando-rubato in a study of this style made by Bela Bartok), and partly from the special technical features that were used by native Rumanian instruments. Heavy accents which occur frequently in this composition were taken from the strong footfalls of folk dance.

Read more

David Abel

David Abel’s musical activities span a wide range including chamber music, solo recitals, orchestra appearances, and teaching violin and chamber music. Born in Wenatchee Washington in 1935, he began his violin study at the age of three, and continued his work on the West Coast and in San Francisco, where he studied with Naoum Blinder, former concertmaster of the San Francisco Symphony. He was a student of the Alma Trio in chamber-music at the San Francisco Conservatory.
He made his orchestral debut at the age of fourteen with the San Francisco Symphony and has appeared with major orchestras throughout the United States. At eighteen Mr. Abel played his first New York recital, and following that debut concertized in the United States, Canada, Europe, and Latin America. He was a winner of the Leventritt International Violin Competition in 1964, and toured Europe under the auspices of the Martha Baird Rockefeller Foundation.
David Abel has taught at San Jose State University, San Francisco State University, Grinnell College, and Stanford University. He is violinist with the Francesco Chamber Trio, which won the 1974 Naumberg Chamber Music award in New York. He is a participant in the Chamber Music West Festival in San Francisco, a member of the Crown Chamber Players at U.C. Santa Cruz, and has appeared at the Carmel Bach Festival and the Mozart Festival San Luis Obispo.He is currently Artist in Residence with the Francesco Trio at the San Francisco Conservatory.

Julie Steinberg

Pianist Julie Steinberg performs extensively as a soloist and chamber player. She has appeared with the San Francisco Symphony and has been a featured soloist in its Mostly Mozart Festival and its New and Unusual Music Series. In addition, she has been soloist with the Oakland Symphony Sound Spectrum and with the Berkeley Symphony. She is a participant in the Chamber Music West Festival in San Francisco and also performs regularly as an assisting artist. In this capacity she has appeared in Master Classes both in the US. and in Europe with cellist, Mstislav Rostropovich and with flutist, Jean-Pierre Rampal. Julie Steinberg holds a Doctor of Musical Arts degree from Stanford University and is currently on the faculty of Mills College in Oakland, California

Read more

Beethoven: Violin Sonata, Op. 96 - Enescu: Violin Sonata, Op. 25 (1983)

Beethoven, Enescu

David Abel, Julie Steinberg

    Stereophile

"To my mind, this is one of the most significant records I've ever heard. This record retains the virtues of an audiophile evaluation record. The violin sound captured on this disc is astonishingly real. This record captures the feeling of being at a truly inspired performance."

Stereophile

Beethoven: Violin Sonata, Op. 96 - Enescu: Violin Sonata, Op. 25 (1983)

Beethoven, Enescu

David Abel, Julie Steinberg

Mastering Engineer:

Analog Mastering - Bruce Leek

Analog to High Definition Digital Transfer: Bruce Brown, Puget Sound Studios Puget Sound Studios received the tapes from Wilson Audiophile Recordings, LLC, in a wooden crate. Master Tapes were then catalogued in an excel spreadsheet. Each Master Tape! was then inspected, cleaned with an anti-fungal solution, and then a lubricant was applied to prepare the Master Tapes for the transfer process. Approximately 8 of the first 13 reels had to be baked to reformulate the binding. This was done in an incubator at 135 degrees for 24 hours and then they were left to cool back down to room temperature for the next 24 hours. All splices were inspected and repaired, if necessary. 

Microphones:

A spaced-pair of Schoeps microphones, driving a vacuum tube line-level amplifier, are used to capture a naturally open, and dynamically accurate sonic presentation.

Producer:David A. Wilson
Recording Engineer:David A. Wilson, Sheryl Lee Wilson, David A. Wilson III
Recording location:

The sonic image of the violin should originate just to the right of the inside edge of the left speaker. The overall tonal balance of this recording reflects the recording site (Mills College Concert Hall), the instruments and the recording approach, being slightly warm and never strident.

Recording Type & Bit Rate:Analog to DSD64

This album was recorded to Analog tape. It was then transferred to the DSD bit rate indicated above.

Quality & Channel Selection Digitized at Analog to DSD64
Select Quality and Channels to calculate the price below More info

Quality

  • DXD
  • 64fs
  • 128fs
  • 256fs

Channels

  • Binaural
  • Stereo
  • Multi
  • ST+MCH
For albums, lower DSD bit rates (128 and/or 64) are available at no surcharge. This does not apply for DXD selection.
Album Download duration price
Wson8315: Beethoven: Violin Sonata, Op. 96 - Enescu: Violin Sonata, Op. 25
00:52:10   Select quality & channels above
Tracks
1.
Violin Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96 - I. Allegro moderato
Beethoven
00:10:40   Select quality & channels above
2.
Violin Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96 - II. Adagio espressivo
Beethoven
00:07:13   Select quality & channels above
3.
Violin Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96 - III. Scherzo: Allegro
Beethoven
00:02:00   Select quality & channels above
4.
Violin Sonata No. 10 in G Major, Op. 96 - IV. Poco allegretto
Beethoven
00:08:48   Select quality & channels above
5.
"Violin Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Op. 25, ""Dans le caractere populaire roumain"" - I. Moderato malin
Enescu
00:08:00   Select quality & channels above
6.
"Violin Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Op. 25, ""Dans le caractere populaire roumain"" - II. Andante soste
Enescu
00:07:46   Select quality & channels above
7.
"Violin Sonata No. 3 in A Minor, Op. 25, ""Dans le caractere populaire roumain"" - III. Allegro con
Enescu
00:07:43   Select quality & channels above

User Reviews

Other albums from this label